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Twyla Johnson's creativity featured in the Bicentennial Photo Documentaries gallery in Jackson

On Friday, Dec. 8, the Blue Magnolia Films/ Corner to Corner Production celebrated Twyla Johnson, an Alcorn State University alumna, as one of their featured Mississippi storytellers at their special premiere screening. The premiere film screening of the Bicentennial Photo Documentaries was held at the Dr. Billy Kim International Center at Belhaven University.

On Saturday, Dec. 9, Blue Magnolia Films/Corner to Corner Productions, the city of Jackson, Greater Jackson Arts Council, and the Mississippi Heritage Trust commemorated the Mississippi Bicentennial with the unveiling of a large-scale interactive photo gallery. Each image in the gallery is embedded with a QR code that can be scanned by viewers with smartphones to view each story.

“The Mississippi Mile event and Celebrating Storytellers: A Bicentennial Photo Exhibit, will instill a sense of unity and pride for Jackson during the Bicentennial,” said David Lewis, project specialist for Greater Jackson Arts Council.

Johnson was among the nominated “Mississippi Storytellers” celebrated for capturing key questions that shaped the state from its beginning.

“My creation was meant to showcase and spark pathways to cultural and economic revitalization for southwest Mississippi, and address historical legacies through personalized narratives,” said Johnson.

Producers Alison Fast, Chandler Griffin, and Aaron Phillips supported Jackson in narrating her stories. My two stories: Homemade Happiness & Quilting: Legacy Keepers were very personal to me because the legacies and voices of the past should be heard and recognized.

“Each story has a unique message for those willing to listen. Perhaps in no other place is it more vital to hear the stories of our past and cast our future from those conversations together.

The gallery, stretching the length of Capitol Street from the King Edward Hotel to Two Mississippi Museums (235 West Capitol Street), will remain on display through the end of February in downtown Jackson.